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The journey Is Marathon Not A Sprint: Experts

To find out, how it is like to build things from scratch, the panel had Gautam Madhavan, Founder & CEO, Mad influence; Girish Ananthanarayanan, COO & Director, Peepul; Yashas Khoday, CTO, FYERS Securities. The panel was moderated by Dr. Miniya Chatterji, CEO, Sustain Labs.

‘The age is just a number’ and ‘talent has no age’, both the sayings fit perfectly in the Indian startup ecosystem. India is witnessing many startups that are trying the change the innovation landscape at a very fast pace. To find out how it is like to build things from scratch, the panel had Gautam Madhavan, Founder & CEO, Mad influence; Girish Ananthanarayanan, COO & Program Director, Peepul; Yashas Khoday, CTO, FYERS Securities. The panel was moderated by Dr. Miniya Chatterji, CEO, Sustain Labs.

Explaining the importance of failure in the initial phases, Yashas expressed, “After getting rejected by one of the largest global fintech companies, I was quite dejected, very upset. It actually helped me quite a bit because it motivated me to sharpen my skill sets more. I took up a course on algorithmic trading, which deepened my knowledge of technology and finance even more and because of that failure, I get the opportunity to look back. So I really believe that failing is a part of the journey and it’s a very important step for us to grow as a person.”

“It’s important to know that it’s okay to do mistakes, as long as you’re learning from it. And, as long as you have your mind in the right space. Some things will not work but as long as you learn from it and pass on that learning to the rest of your team, it will be advantageous,” he added.

Expressing the significance of a team, Gautam explained, “I learned from my past that team building is a very important aspect of any startup. Back in 2015, when I started a crowdfunding platform, it was too early for a country like India. Although we managed to get some business, the profit was just around 1 per cent. Due to no-profitability, we sold the idea to get back some part of the investment.”

”Even after Mad Influence, the biggest factor that makes me work even harder was my team. They believed in me, left some good companies, and joined us. The only thing that keeps me going is that I have to add value to the team.” he added.

Elucidating the problems in the education system, Girish remarked that “I had a great career with a leading consulting firm, but there was one project where things went downhill for me due to a variety of factors. That was a failure in all its glory – it was difficult, but there was a lot to learn from it – even 4-5 years out, it acts as a centering mechanism whenever I consider going down an unsustainable path.”

“After joining Peepul, we have had the challenge to recalibrate the world’s largest education system – especially in the wake of COVID. It’s been exponential non-linear growth for Peepul – working across 300,000 teachers and 100,000 schools now. We wanted to go deeper into the system in the geographies we are in, as it would take decades, if not centuries, to improve education. There are lots of innovations that are getting created, as we continue our work – so we are trying to codify that and making it available for other nonprofits, other organizations, and governments so that they can learn from our work to solve the social problem,” he added. 

Source: Business World

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